Blogging bit by bit

There are 2 ways of working.

The first is in batches, a couple of hours one or 2 times a week.

The second is bit by bit, day by day.

Many people find themselves picking one of the two ways thinking that it’s the best way of working.

But it turns out it depends on the work you’re doing and also the way you feel like working.

Last year I was focused on scheduling posts and there were times when I’d be scheduling a week of blog posts in one go.

Over the past few weeks I’ve been writing and publishing a blog post at the end of my day. At first it felt strange and I was frustrated that my batch blogging habit had fallen away.

However, from taking the bit by bit approach I’m enjoying blogging more. I spend moments of my day thinking about what I want to say and then I type it up at night. It feels like I’m creating a better writing practice because I’m clicking publish each day.

It’s not to say that the bit by bit approach is the best way of working. But what I can say is that it’s going pretty well for me right now.

 

Gratitude through challenging times

I start each day with a gratitude practice of listing 10 things I am grateful for.

Things are changing quickly and becoming quite difficult in some ways. It can be difficult to keep up with gratitude through challenging times.

You might find yourself wondering what exactly there is to be grateful for in a time of such great uncertainty. But I find that if you focus on the good bits (no matter how small) there is always something to be grateful for. I have no doubt that before you know it you’ll have reached 10 things pretty easily.

It could be sunny weather, the people you live with, the food in your cupboards, your health, the smoothie you made, being able to communicate with loved ones far away, the fact that you’re able to work from home, the friend that sent you a song as a pick me up, the extra time you have now you’re no longer commuting to work or even your favourite (almost) daily blog.

It might be difficult to think of things when you’re fearful or overwhelmed but know that this the perfect time to put your daily gratitude practice into practice

The opportunity to be supported

So often, we’re afraid to be vulnerable and let people know where we’re at. In doing that you miss out on the opportunity to be supported by people that care.

What often ends up happening is you feel frustrated that there is no one to support you, not realising that you haven’t even given them a chance.

The best way to break this habit is to be more open when talking to the people that you know you can trust. Instead of having those Hey, how’s it going? Yeah, good thanks, you? types of conversations make the effort to be a little more vulnerable.

It might feel strange at first but when you talk to the right people they’ll listen to you and show support which is sometimes all you need. Your act of bravery might have a knock on effect because often you find that the other person will start to open up more too.

The goal of a routine

If you’re doing the same set of activities on a regularly basis over time it’ll become part of your routine.

It’ll be set into your subconscious to the point where you go from start to finish with little to no thought in between.

That saves you a lot of energy because you’re no longer having to think about what to do next.

Sometimes when we take a break and spend our time differently, the routine that was so ingrained in us falls away.

All of a sudden the thing you once did at the exact same time each day doesn’t get done at all or you end up doing it hours later than you usually would.

Once the break is over the old routine (if implemented well for a long enough period of time) will fall back into place, almost as though it never left, that’s the kind of result I aim for with the routines I implement into my life.

It’s almost like how people say you don’t forget how to ride a bike, except routines can be forgotten if you step away from them for long enough.

2 kinds of complainers

Which one are you?

The first kind is the one we all know and love (or perhaps just tolerate through excessive eye rolls). This person is problem focused. They find a problem with anything and everything.

What’s worse is if you offer a potential solution they’ll probably find a problem with that too.

The second person is solution focused. They’ll complain as a way to vent their frustrations but then they’ll move on and do something about it.

The first person never manages to progress nearly as much as the second.

One small thing could change it all

It’s like a keystone habit but for moments.

A keystone habit is a term created by Charles Duhigg that was featured in his book The Power of Habit, in Duhiggs words it is ‘small changes or habits that people introduce into their routines that unintentionally carry over into other aspects of their lives’.

But what if that could be applied to moments that we experience.

Sometimes all it takes is a conversation to create a shift in perspective and if you follow that feeling it could end up changing your life for the better.

Imagine you’re pretty frustrated and uninspired by life then one day you meet someone and have a conversation about aspirations that moves you. So much so that you’re driven to make changes like start a project, spend more time with friends, make time for the people you live, go for that promotion at work, volunteer or pick up a hobby you’ve been meaning to try.

Chances are you have at least one conversation everyday so that perspective shifting moment could come at any time. However, it’s also important to not be too reliant on external factors in order to drive change in your life.

If you’re not happy with where you’re at you probably have some idea (no matter how vague) of the way you’d actually things to be.

You don’t need a stranger to prompt change in your life.

The love of reading

I used to love reading and I did it any chance I got. I’d stay up late with a torch reading a book under the covers until I could keep my eyes open no longer and as soon as I woke up I’d start reading again.

It was something so simple that brought me so much joy.

But the older I got the less I read. The time I used to spend reading was replaced by youtube, watching shows online and social media.

Now all of a sudden I’m in my twenties and read 100 times slower and it’s much harder to get engrossed in the books I read.

I think being on my phone and laptop, constantly switching between tabs and apps has trickled over into how I read. Reading is a calm thing that requires focus and time and I don’t give as much attention to those kinds of activities like I used to.

I miss the love of reading I used to have so I’ve decided to try and get it back.

I’m starting with reading to replace some of the time I’d spend watching shows and so far so good.

What was the last book you read?