Becoming obsolete

One of my most memorable scenes from Willy Wonka and the chocolate factory comes quite near to the beginning.

Charlie’s dad worked in a toothpaste factory screwing lid onto each tube one by one. Then one day he lost his job because the factory he worked in bought a machine that could do his job quicker and cheaper.

Just like that his job role had become obsolete.

That’s happening more and more these days.

A prime example is self service machines instead of a cashier. Instead of a shop having 4  people working on the tills you can have 4 self service machines and one person there to oversee and assist if necessary.

Granted some people prefer being served by a person instead of serving themselves. However, the main point is that the cashier role is no longer as necessary as it used to be.

Does the customer determine value?

I recently saw some things for sale and my first thought was that I wouldn’t buy them. In my opinion the items weren’t worth the price they were being sold for.

But people were buying the items.

Turns out that that even though I didn’t value the items at the price they were being sold for other people did, which got me thinking.

Who determines value?

If you’re selling something for £50 and nobody buys it, is it actually worth £50.

Or does value come from what the customer is willing to pay for it.

In my opinion it is the customer that determines the value because they’re the ones willing to pay for it. However, it is worth noting that just because you’re unable to sell to one group of people, doesn’t mean you’re prices are too high.

It might just mean that those people don’t see the value in what you’re selling.

But maybe another group will.

Temporary excess

If you’re someone that regularly consumes content online you’ve probably noticed that right now there is more stuff than ever.

More photo’s and videos than you even have the energy to consume, it’s overwhelming.

Some days people are all sharing the same thing, telling you what you should think, telling you what you shouldn’t be doing or selling something you don’t want.

I guess the problem with more stuff is that when it isn’t helpful, useful or interesting it’s just more stuff to wade through until you can get to the bits that you actually care about.

But just because there is more to consume doesn’t mean you need to spend more time online.

Try giving yourself a time limit, being selective about what you consume and unfollowing anything that isn’t benefiting you.