Going through it or getting over it

There’s a story I’ve heard countless times as a kid called we’re going on a bear hunt.

The story follows a family going on a bear hunt and on their way they encounter grass, water and mud etc. All followed by the famous lines:

We can’t go under it
We can’t go over it
Oh no we’ll have to go through it

I don’t remember how the story ended but I can’t help but feel as though the story was a metaphor for life.

And so the moral is that you can’t bypass stuff. You have to go through it to get past it, even when it’s difficult.

Lessons in friendship

Perhaps one of the most valuable lessons a friend has taught me is to not take life so seriously and to laugh more at the ebb and flow of life.

Life is totally different when you’re willing to be less rigid and laugh at your experiences. When you’re hard on yourself for simply being a human that goes through a variety of experiences, life becomes hard.

But when you laugh and remind yourself that it’s all just a collection of experiences then life somehow softens towards you.

Bezos, Amazon and temporary things

I read an article on Jeff Bezos about a month ago and there was part of it that really stuck with me.

He basically said that the fall of Amazon was coming and that all he could do was delay it for as long as possible.

I don’t know what it was about his words specifically but I felt like there was great power in what he had said.

He’s built something iconic (despite the way the company is run for warehouse workers) that will never be forgotten but he knows that the reign of Amazon won’t last forever.

But I think Bezos’ words are a great reminder that everything is temporary, whether it’s totally amazing or incredibly blah.

That’s a lesson that comes from life itself.

Molly my-way

I once new someone who’s infamous line was ‘But why?’.

It made for a difficult relationship when you were questioned every time you said no. It would go something like can you (insert favour here)? I’d reply no, then be hit with but why, I’d say I don’t want to and be hit with but why again.

It was incredibly frustrating and even years later I’m irked greatly and become incredibly sharp when people don’t take no for an answer.

What really got me was that I was terrified of ever rockingĀ  the boat so saying no was a big deal. When my no wasn’t accepted it felt like it wasn’t ‘safe’ for me to be myself because when I tried it was being rejected.

So I suppose I’m still moved by those past experiences. But what I’m learning that the lesson is to be okay with saying no without any attachment to how the recipient responds because you don’t have to do anything you don’t want to.