5 simple ways to improve your blog

Create cohesive content

You don’t have to write about a single topic but you don’t want your posst to feel like they belong to 5 different blogs.

Post consistently

It could be daily, weekly or monthly posts. Find a schdule that works for you and then stick to it.

Find your audience

You might use Twitter, Instagram, Tik Tok, word of mouth, LinkedIn or an event. You don’t need to spend endless hours marketing yourself but it is useful to have some idea of where to find the people your content is being made for.


Keep things simple

Make creating a blog post from start to finish as easy as possible, this could be through having content planning days, keeping a week or month ahead of schedule or having a blog post creation checklist so you always know exactly what you need to do.

Be yourself

This has nothing to do with sharing personal details of your life but instead it’s about not trying to hard to do something that doesn’t feel natural. Blogging is so much more enjoyable when you allow yourself to just be whether that is wrting about social media, reviewing designer purchases or documenting your journey to becoming a more mindful consumer.

Sister post to 5 reasons your blog might not be going as well as you’d hoped.

Why I’ll never run out of ideas

How do you come up with something to write about every single day?

Write about your interests and write about your experiences.

The origin of this blog was about picking a small moment of each day and writing about the lesson I took from it.

The small moment could be watching a film I loved as a child, going shopping, baking a cake, a conversation with a stranger or running for the bus.

When I decided I wanted to start daily blogging a little over 3 years ago, I knew I had to decide to write about something that felt easy for me. As much as I didn’t want to be someone who wrote about any and everything, I also knew that I didn’t want to be so niche that I felt restricted to the point where I’d struggle for what to write.

Even when I took a break from blogging, I was still writing, making notes and the ideas just kept flowing.

I think that’s a sign that I did well picking the content for my daily blog. In a recent post, I shared that in 2022, I’ll no longer be daily blogging but I have no doubt that the abundance of ideas I will keep flowing.

Why I’ve decided to stop daily blogging? (For real this time)

Towards the end of 2020, I wrote a post sharing how I’d planned to stop daily blogging. Not long after, I changed my mind. I’d realised that I wasn’t ready to give up daily blogging yet because I enjoyed it and it challenged me. I also felt proud knowing I’d committed to something challenging that I didn’t have to do.

If you’re a super keen reader of this blog you’ll be aware that over the past few months I’ve become incredibly inconsistent with posting daily. As time went on it got worse until November 2021 when I stopped daily blogging altogether and only published a total of 7 posts.

I’ve never been hard on myself for skipping a day here and there but when it’s a regular thing, there’s clearly an issue.

The issue is that I’ve been doing something I no longer want to commit to. I used to wonder how long I could carry on daily blogging for without actually considering that it’s okay for me to just stop.

In 2022, I’ll be dropping from 7 posts a week to 3 which feels like I’m making things way too easy but I also think it’s okay to not put too much pressure on myself. I guess I just realised that I didn’t want to daily blog anymore. However, I’d identified myself with being a daily blogger so much and expected that I’d do it for much longer that it’s been difficult to admit that I want to stop.

Catching up and clearing out

If you’ve been a regular reader for more than a few months, you’ll have noticed that I stopped blogging for about 6 weeks. There were a few posts here and there but it was far from my usual daily blogging.

However, over the past few days I’ve been getting my ducks in a row and I’m now back.

For the rest of this month, I intend to catch up on all the posts I’ve missed, so expect an overwhelming influx of content to be read at your own pace. The reason for this is I have about 10 completed posts, 100 half finished posts on WordPress and around 50 posts written elsewhere.

I quite like the idea of clearing out what I’ve written and putting out fresh content in the new year. I’ve finally decided to make some big changes with TDG as it goes into it’s third year which I’ll share more about later this month.

Despite not posting, I’ve still been writing and I have plenty to share. I also have big changes in my personal life which will result in more work and career related posts in the coming months.

I’m excited to be back posting again and look forward to sharing my words with you.

How to write 1001 blog posts

All you have to do is focus on each single post, one by one, day by day and suddenly you’ll hit 100, 250, 500, 1000 and then 1001.

If you miss a day or 2, you need to be willing to make it up to avoid falling behind so far that you’re unable to catch up. You have to be willing to commit and to write when it feels difficult, not just when it feels easy.

It’ll take a few months short of 3 years which seems like a long time but looking back, it’ll fly by.

5 Reasons your blog might not be going as well as you’d hoped

Your content isn’t cohesive

If your content varies greatly, it doesn’t allow you to appeal to any set of people as an audience. As good as it may seem to have mass appeal, if you want to build an audience the best thing you can do is start small.

You post inconsistently

If your reader know that you put a new post out every Sunday they will come to expect it and even look forward to it. If you say you’ll post every Sunday and sometimes you do but other times you post on tuesday or you skip a week, readers may lose interest because you’re no longer showing up in the way that you said you would.

You haven’t reached the right audience

Seth Godin has said many times, you’re either not reaching the right people or you’re not making good enough stuff. You’re content could be outstanding quality but it’s important that the right people find your work as that is why you created it in the first place.

You make too many changes

If the colours, logo, and layout of your site are constantly changing, readers won’t come to recognise it. This means readers won’t be able to establish that sense of familiarity when they visit your site, it will feel like something new each time you change something.

You don’t stand out

Obviously there is no way to be totally unique and often people copy the stuff that they’ve seen work for others in the hopes that they will achieve the same success. However, if the look of your site and content that you post is exactly the same as 1001 other people, what incentive is their for readers to choose your site over another?

If you’re a regular reader you may notice that there are things on this list I’ve done or even continue to do. The purpose of this list is to offer some ideas because sometimes when things aren’t going well we get so overwhelmed that we don’t even think of reasons why.

Once you identify the reasons things aren’t going well, you can put a plan in place to overcome them.

I wrote this for you

You know the feeling you get when you read something that resonates. You feel seen, you feel heard and you feel connected, often to a complete stranger.

But this person was able to form something that encapsulates a feeling or a moment from your life. It can often serve as a reminder that we’re not so different or as separate from each other as we sometimes end up believing.

If you can be moved by words written 200 years ago then our problems, challenges and experiences aren’t so unique to us, there are plenty of other people that know what it’s like. In my teenage years I liked to beelive that somehow the author knew that I’d need to read their words, almost as if they wrote them just for me. Of course that wasn’t the case but it was a nice thought at the time.

I’ve held on to that idea but allowed it to evolve a little. As someone who writes and shares their words, I never write with a particular person in mind but I know that people are often drawn to read about things they can relate to.

I’ve read great words that have moved me and so I hope to do the same. I guess it’s sort of like taking one and passing it on.

‘I wrote this for you because of what they wrote for me.’

The role of the creator

When it comes to this blog, I’m in charge of the writing process and you are in charge of the rest. That includes the views, likes, comments and how popular each post gets.

As the creator, as much as you might want to be, you can’t be in control of the numbers and of how well your work performs because that’s not your role.

Your role is to do the work and as long as you’re doing it well, you have to learn to be okay with everything that comes with it.

Obviously if you earn a living from creating, the stakes are much higher. You might need to report back to someone and of course what they want to hear is that the numbers have gone up and at worst that they’ve stayed the same.

However, in spite of the above, I think it’s good to look at the numbers occasionally (even if they don’t affect your income). It can be useful to see the kind of stuff that is performing well. For example, one of my most popular posts is about Instagram and I’m also aware that my posts about being a writer and the writing process tend to do fairly well. I enjoy writing about those topics so choosing to do more of that would be a win-win for me as the writer and you as the reader. I wouldn’t have that knowledge without looking at the numbers.

But most importantly, the key is to not become so attached to the point that you’re happy when the numbers are up and sad when they’re down. The only thing you need to do is create.

3 daily blogging writing routines

A few ideas for writing routines for those that blog everyday.

Write a full post on your commute to and from work

If you work 9-5 this gives you the opportunity to write 10 posts within 5 days and then at the weekend you don’t have to write at all. Getting into the routine of writing at a set time each day means you start associating that specific time with the writing process which can help you find your flow.

Write one post every evening

This is the most simple routine. It gives you the whole day to live your life and the evening can become a time of reflection where you think about what has happened throughout the day and then choose something to write about. The only issue with this method is it doesnt allow you to have time off.

Write at any time of day but batch schedule your posts

This allows you to work quite freely whilst the batching means you can always stay a few days ahead or give yourself time off from writing.

Optional commitment

In a recent conversation, I spoke about this blog and how I share something everyday. I explained that I don’t allow ‘feeling like I have nothing good to write’ to hold me back from posting.

For many people, the idea of making a commitment to do something that you don’t have to do every single day isn’t particularly appealing. Part of the reason for this is because there’s nothing to keep them on the hook. With the example of daily blogging, who keeps you accountable?

If I don’t post for a day or a week there are no repercussions. Nobody get’s annoyed and nobody will email to ask where the new blog post is, there are no real negative implications at all (aside from my own internal frustrations). And so if this is the type of thing you’re committed to, you need to find a strong reason within yourself to keep going because there will always be days where you don’t feel like it.