Nobody wants to feel like they’ve been duped

When we think about getting someone to buy something the first is probably that it’s a bad thing. Perhaps what comes to mind is a greasy car salesmen or some sort of trickster who will tell lies to convince you to spend money.

But what about the other times we buy things based on being influenced and we’re happy with the choice. I don’t consider that to be a bad thing.

It could be a £1,100 pair of Valentino Garavani boots that you feel great in, you get you compliments every time you wear them and they were purchased in a store where you received excellent service. It could also be £10 water bottle that doesn’t leak.

The issue arises when we buy something and it doesn’t work as it should, it doesn’t feel worth it, it feels like a waste of money, we regret the purchase or it stops working and you can’t get a refund.

Nobody wants to feel like they’ve been duped, we want to feel like we’re making good choices and spending our money well.

The problem with trying to be relatable

A lot of people build personal brands around ‘the struggle’, being relatable and essentially saying that they are ‘just like you’ (but a little more visible).

People are often drawn to things that they can relate to. It’s comforting to see someone also going after the thing that they are working towards. But if their interest in you is because they feel like they’re like you (often including financially), of course how they feel towards you will change when they can no longer relate.

If you spend time growing a personal brand and a big part of that is you saying you’re just like the people watching, listening to and supporting you, if you’re now regularly shopping from luxury brands, mingling with celebrities, attending events and you’ve bumped yourself up a few tax brackets then you’re clearly not ‘just like everyone else’, your life is now different.

There’s nothing wrong with that at all, I think the issue comes when people try to deny that their life has changed much in order to still be relatable. We’re all aware that a persons financial situation doesn’t mean they don’t go through some of the same things as the average person but it’s okay to acknowledge the other parts of your life too.

With influencers the need to be relatable comes from the fact that it’s easier to sell to people when they feel like you’re just like them rather than when you show up as a millionaire that you are. It’s really just a marketing tactic which I don’t think it necessarily a bad thing. However, it shifts influencers away from being the relatable stranger online who recommends things they’ve used or clothes they’ve worn to instead being just another sales person trying to get you to buy something.

A convincing sales person

Anyone can make a living selling things if they’re good enough at driving sales.

It’s not about being an ‘influencer’, having the most followers or being the loudest.

Sometimes it’s about having something that people want and presenting it to them in a way where they value it enough to buy it.

Yet we somehow find a way to over complicate things. Perhaps by convincing ourselves that we’re not ready.

But if you have something you believe is worth selling, you don’t need to wait for a big audience to do it.

Start small, work your way up and focus on being good at what you do instead of on being popular.

Falling for a scam

Consumerism is out to get us.

Or at least that’s how it often feels anyway.

I’ve been noticing emails on my inbox from various retailers with things like last chance, don’t miss out, you haven’t completed your order (which is super creepy in my opinion).

Instead of finding it enticing, I just find it overwhelming, its too much. Often these great deals aren’t even that great and the ‘last chance’ will always come around again.

It’s like a false sense of urgency to try and get you to spend money on things you don’t even really want.

One of the biggest consumerism scams is the discounted items that are equal to or more expensive than the original price.

10% off something that costs £20 isn’t a great deal when yesterday it only cost £15.

Black Friday: A false sense of urgency

Buy it now, before it’s too late!

So yesterday was black Friday and I think for the first time ever I noticed how full on it actually is.

There are so many things to possibly buy and so many deals and discounts to give into.

As I scrolled through sites looking for potential purchases I has a sort of eureka moment which led to me deciding not to buy anything at all.

You see the thing is I didn’t actually need any of the things I was going to buy, I just wanted them. Things for the sake of things or things just for show.

It feels great to buy things and know you saved money.

But black Friday is also quite intense and I feel that a false sense of urgency is created with these short term sales.

On one hand it’s great because you can save money on things you’ve been wanting or needing for a while.

But on the other hand there are so many emails, tweets, YouTube videos, insta-stories and blog posts providing you with discount codes and links that even if you didn’t plan to buy anything you might find yourself taking (or getting taken) advantage) of the 30% discount on a luxury skincare brand.

It gets to a point where you feel good buying something you don’t even need just because it was £14 cheaper.

So, I thought it might be worth reminding you (an myself) that you’re not saving money if you had no intentions to buy it in the first place.