Boosting morale and feeling connected

Through challenging times it’s always helpful to find ways of boosting morale.

A common way of doing this is through bringing people together.

Very little compares to the feeling of people being united for a common cause. When that cause is gratitude, it really can help people feel connected to each other.

Right now a lot of people are becoming aware of the contributions that particular people make in society.

Despite everything that is going on there is this sense of ‘things aren’t particularly great right now but there are people showing up everyday that are helping to make things a little bit better or easier and I’m grateful for it‘.

I think just knowing that there are people showing up even though it’s difficult is enough to make us all feel a little bit better.

 

Who you think you are

For many people if they give it some thought they’ll find that a large proportion of their character is based on who they think they are.

Often those opinions are made at a young age without any real judgement. Yet you carry them with you into adulthood without even checking to see if your mind has changed.

It could be something as simple as a food that you don’t eat. Perhaps as a child you weren’t willing to explore with what you ate so you told yourself ‘I’m not the kind of person that eats that kind of food’ or ‘I don’t like to experiment with what I eat, I just like simple food’. Twenty years later you’re still saying the same thing and maybe that’s true but maybe you haven’t changed.

We get so attached to the idea we create of who we think we are that we close ourselves off to anything that challenges that.

Policing perfect

If you go on social media you’ll find an abundant amount of people policing ‘perfect’. They’ll criticise, comment and assume as though people aren’t human beings.

But the thing is, you can never please everyone and you will make mistakes.

And as great as the internet is, nobody needs 4658 strangers criticising them for something they said or did, even if it was wrong. Ganging up on someone is never a good way to get them to change their ways.

The internet and social media in particular is a great place to practice ‘just because you can, doesn’t mean you should’. Just because you can send a comment telling someone off for doing something that you don’t think they should have done, doesn’t mean you should.

Better yet ask yourself ‘is this useful or helpful?’, ‘what will I achieve by doing this?’.

Chances are you might find it’s actually better to say nothing at all.

Knowing what you need

A useful skill to acquire is to know what you need in your off moments. But then to go one step further and honour those needs.

So often we get a feeling for what we should do but we push it aside and trudge on. We tell ourselves it’s inconvenient, we don’t want to offend people or we feel stuck with where we are or previous decisions we’ve made.

But when you ignore the feeling of knowing, there will always be consequences. Things like feeling uncomfortable, regret or frustration.

And often we put those feelings on the person or people we were with at the time. In those cases, it might feel easier to blame others because it relinquishes you of your responsibility.

However, perhaps next time the feeling of knowing what you need comes around you could try following it. Of course be polite or respectful of who you’re with but don’t forget the importance of taking care of yourself.

A new version of you

It’s not always easy to show people that you’ve changed.

Especially when on the outside you look exactly the same. For example, how do you show someone that you’ve developed new neurological pathways?

For the most part when you change, you do it for you. Although on the other side of it you might feel like you have something to prove. Or maybe you’re proud of how far you’ve come and so you want to share it.

But in truth when you’ve really changed you won’t need to parade it around. It’ll be clear to see in the way you talk and the things you do.

And sure they’ll be people who refuse to see it because they liked you stagnant and they aren’t ready willing to see that you’ve evolved but that’s not your burden to carry.

What it’s like to be an ideas person

Years ago I had an idea to create a lifestyle site based in my city. It would have included things to do and see, restaurant reviews and recommendations, arts and culture, places to shop etc…

That idea never came to life. I wanted it to be a group thing, a site run by team of people. We’d have been writers, editors, photographers and creatives. But I never spoke about the idea, not even once. Plus, at the time I didn’t have any people in my life I could have asked to contribution or run the site with me.

A few years later I had another idea for a collective of sorts. A group of creatives and makers. We’d have been bloggers, graphic designers, fashion designers, photographers, artists, illustrators, web designers…

It would be have been a group of people sharing spaces to work on their projects individually but also together. They’d pay a monthly fee and reinvest the money back into themselves and their work.

Just like the first idea, I never spoke about it and nothing ever came of it.

I think I created these ideas because I craved a community/tribe of people I could relate to.

A few months ago I had another idea (if you can’t already tell I’m quite the ideas person). It was for a society that would hold monthly events and I’d write a monthly newsletter.

When I think about how different my life could have been if I’d pursued these ideas it’s slightly terrifying. It’s not always easy to imagine yourself leading, organising and having the confidence to pick yourself.

But, these ideas are the kinds of things I would’ve wished I’d done if I saw other people doing them, yet I’ve never had the ability to do them myself.

I plan to work on evolving into the kind of person that doesn’t wait to be picked and isn’t afraid to lead over the coming months. And right now that looks like doing things, making things happen and bringing my ideas to life.

Challenges in common

One of things that makes a challenging experience more challenging is feeling alone.

One of the biggest misconceptions is that you are alone in your difficulties because you’re not.

With a planet of over 7 billion people I’d like to think that pretty much all my challenges are shared by at least one other person on this earth.

But it isn’t a misery loves company thing or a let us rejoice in the fact that your life is just as challenging as mine.

It’s more about the fact that if 264276 other people have experienced the same challenges as me (failure for example), then maybe it’s not as big of a deal as I thought.