In search of the next big thing

Setting goals achieving them but always wanting more because you’re never satisfied.

I’ve often found that when I achieve something I’ve been working towards it never feels as good as I thought it would.

I just move on to the next big thing.

It’s as though as soon as I attain the thing I want it’s no longer a big deal because if I can get A then I want B and C.

But the problem with always being in search of the next big thing is that you might just be forever dissatisfied.

And maybe you feel that way because you don’t really know what you’re chasing.

Are you doing things you never thought you could do just to prove you can? Or is it because you want to make an offering or leave a legacy?

Whatever you’re reason might be, it’s definitely worth having one.

 

 

3 kinds of people in the workplace

Person A
Someone who is confident, asks questions, isn’t afraid to rock the boat when necessary, puts themselves forward, goes above and beyond, voices their opinions and is keen to learn new things.

Person B
Someone who does what they’re told and is content ploughing along. They might want to do more but they’re unlikely to seek it out because it would require more of them than they’re willing to give.

Person C
Someone that thought they could be Person B but deep down they’re a Person A, they just don’t have the confidence. They’re the person who is scared to put themselves forward but wants to do more. They have opinions but don’t often share them. They want to do more than the bare minimum but are also afraid of the attention.

I think most people fit into one of these categories. And of course overtime you can move from one to another. When Person B decides they want more they become person C and then (hopefully) Person A.

But interestingly enough person A can change too. Often caused by their ideas not being embraced, or getting too much pushback, being told to be a little less of themselves etc.

Person A is the most valuable of the three, they get things done whilst being willing to express their humanness.

Person B is like a cog. They don’t stand out and anyone could do what they do.

And Person C, well they have the potential to be great, if they’re willing to try.

Do I have to struggle in order to succeed?

I’m starting to wonder whether struggle has to be apart of every ‘success story’.

There’s this thing about the struggle, going as close to the brink as possible but managing to find a way to make it. That story is celebrated it’s the ‘rags to riches’ story and one of the most well known examples is Cinderella.

Her mother died, her father married a woman with 2 daughters who all treated her poorly and then her father died but in the end she married a Prince!

But I sometimes wonder if life really has to be that way. Constantly hearing of peoples struggle on the road to success ingrains that narrative in our minds and makes us think that the struggles we face will lead us to greatness.

Like my life is super crappy now but in 10 years time whilst I’m counting my big bucks I’ll tell people about how I slept on my friends couch, had to sell my car and most of my possessions just to get by but look at me now.

I currently work an office based 9-5 and I’d like to think I can do more beyond that in my lifetime. But I don’t want a Cinderella type struggle and I don’t want my hard times to be the justification for any good stuff that comes my way.

What I’m realising though is that there’s a big difference between working hard and going through hard times.

So no, I don’t think the struggle is necessary in order to succeed but I can’t deny it adds some pizzazz to the how I got to where I am today story.

The right time to quit

Perhaps there is no right time.

It’s easy to quit in the early stages but gets harder over time. After 3 years once you’ve  invested time effort and energy quitting, even if it’s for the best feels like giving up.

And so, it’s hard to know the right time to quit. If you’ve been working on something for a while and that could just be a few months  (it depends on how much you’re putting into it), if you’re thinking of quitting don’t make what you’ve put into it so far be the only reason to keep going.

But some questions to ask and things to consider are:
Do you still believe in what you’re doing?
If you knew what you now know, would you still start today?
Are you doing this for yourself or because you feel you have something to prove?
Do you enjoy doing the work?
Will the end result bring you joy?

Tending to the dream

An important step in achieving the dream life is tending to it. Its like with gardening, you need to do more than just plant seeds. You need to space them the right distance apart, water them or maybe give them something to grow against.

A dream you do nothing with is likely to just remain a dream. But I think by tending to it you’re more likely to actually get it in some way or another.

And maybe that’s a scary thought, actually attaining what you truly want. But what do you have to lose, worst case scenario you end up back where you started with the knowledge that you took a risk to make it happen because you were willing to try.

Caught up

There’s probably around 1-3 things that are priority but 101 things that you could be doing.

So of course you do the 101 things that aren’t particularly important and spend the day flitting between them all. But then later comes, the things you should have been doing are now even more urgent than they were earlier when you had more time.
You got so caught up in things of little significance that you barely have the energy left to do what actually needs to be done.

More often than not you’ll get it done but it won’t be as good as it could have been, not by a long shot.

Is a 9-5 enough?

In an age where we can create our own platforms and put our voices out there I often ask myself if I should be doing more.

Granted I have 2 blogs alongside working full-time and studying part-time but writing on my blog is something that is so safe and familiar to me that I wonder if I should be doing more to stretch myself.

I can’t help but wonder if with all the potential and opportunity in the world right now if just working a 9-5 is enough. In the last 20 years things have changed a hell of a lot and I often think about all the things I’ve ever thought of doing and could be doing.

Speaking, presenting, storytelling, podcasting, youtube, volunteering or starting a business.

I’ve even noticed that a 9-5 for so many is just a means to an end until the side hustle earns them enough money to sustain the minimum lifestyle they require. And even if the side hustle doesn’t become a fulltime thing, they care about it and put so much more into it than they do with there day job.

A lot of us worked towards getting ‘good’ or ‘stable’ jobs in order to live the standard or expected lifestyle. But we never stopped to consider the importance of having, love, joy and excitement for what we do.

Or we didn’t even consider it as an option.

I’d love to know your thoughts.

Is your job your main passion?

Do you have a side hobby or side hustle?