What do you want?

A seemingly simple four word question that is often almost impossible to answer.

Even when you know what you want you’re likely to find yourself making excuses for why it’s not possible for you or how it’s just a daydream.

But also I think it’s difficult to admit what you truly want when you know that you haven’t even tried to make it happen. If your wants don’t align with what you currently do or are currently working towards it highlights where you’ve fallen short.

Nobody wants to be reminded that they’re not where they want to be in life especially when you’re not even working towards what you want.

And so the lesson is to keep checking in with what you want in life. Once you have that figured out all you have to do is start bridging the gap.

Disrupting the plan

Most people have some kind of plan. Even if it’s just a loose idea of how they would like things to be.

You carry it around with you wherever you go, it influences the choices you make.

You say yes to doing that thing that will help you progress and hopefully make things easier in the long run. You say no to things that are fun, exciting and interesting because you consider them a distraction.

But then sometimes something or someone comes along and disrupts the plans you made.

It could be someone that makes you realise that you’re settling, a listing for an amazing kind of job that you didn’t even know existed or meeting someone that went down a non-traditional route and has managed to make a great life for themselves.

Your eyes become open to the possibilities of life. You realise that the plan you made was created to give you a safe and stable life rather than being something you were truly passionate about.

Slowly building

Rome wasn’t built in a day and neither were helpful habits.

If you want to start reading more, getting up at 6am every morning, eating more nourishing food or committing to your creative projects, one day won’t make a difference on it’s own.

It’s a series of days, one by one, bit by bit that make the real difference.

One day isn’t enough to build a habit but that’s where things start. That one day will become 30 days and then 90 until that thing you’ve been doing each day is now part of your daily routine.

When you’re getting started, it’s worth remembering that change takes time. Don’t be disappointed after 3 days if you don’t feel like it, your brain is still getting used to your new way of doing things. Instead focus on it one day at a time and remember that you’re working towards something long-term.

And on days when you don’t feel like practicing your new habit, it won’t matter in the short-run but in the long run you’ll probably be glad you committed to it.

Forgotten dreams

What happened to those dreams off yours, those dreams you had to make, see and do?

When did you forget about the plans you made and what exactly are you doing now?

Everybody has a dream.

Whether it’s something you once worked towards and gave up on or merely that thing you think about as a form of escapism from your reality.

But sometimes we allow our circumstances to crush our dreams and suddenly we’ve forgotten all about what we really wanted. A dream is so much more more than a dream, it motivates us, guides us through daily life and gives us purpose.

Think of your forgotten dream as a neglected plant, now might be the perfect time to tend to it.

What it’s like to be an ideas person

Years ago I had an idea to create a lifestyle site based in my city. It would have included things to do and see, restaurant reviews and recommendations, arts and culture, places to shop etc…

That idea never came to life. I wanted it to be a group thing, a site run by team of people. We’d have been writers, editors, photographers and creatives. But I never spoke about the idea, not even once. Plus, at the time I didn’t have any people in my life I could have asked to contribution or run the site with me.

A few years later I had another idea for a collective of sorts. A group of creatives and makers. We’d have been bloggers, graphic designers, fashion designers, photographers, artists, illustrators, web designers…

It would be have been a group of people sharing spaces to work on their projects individually but also together. They’d pay a monthly fee and reinvest the money back into themselves and their work.

Just like the first idea, I never spoke about it and nothing ever came of it.

I think I created these ideas because I craved a community/tribe of people I could relate to.

A few months ago I had another idea (if you can’t already tell I’m quite the ideas person). It was for a society that would hold monthly events and I’d write a monthly newsletter.

When I think about how different my life could have been if I’d pursued these ideas it’s slightly terrifying. It’s not always easy to imagine yourself leading, organising and having the confidence to pick yourself.

But, these ideas are the kinds of things I would’ve wished I’d done if I saw other people doing them, yet I’ve never had the ability to do them myself.

I plan to work on evolving into the kind of person that doesn’t wait to be picked and isn’t afraid to lead over the coming months. And right now that looks like doing things, making things happen and bringing my ideas to life.

Setting goals and losing steam

It’s now a full week after New Year’s Day.

How are you goals, resolutions or plans coming along?

You might find that after 7 days you’re still enthusiastic and motivated or you might have found that you’ve lost steam.

If you resonate with the latter then it might be useful to ask yourself why?

Why after such a short period of time are you no longer committed or dedicated to the things that you were overflowing with excitement about less than a dozen days ago.

This could be the perfect time to call yourself out and acknowledge that the new year was not enough to change you into a brand new version of you.

There’s nothing wrong with that, in fact I’d say that’s the case for most of us.

Forming new habits or committing to new projects isn’t easy when you’re used to doing things a different way. And so the challenge or the work is to find a way of implementing new habits that works for you.

Unexpected circumstances

Whether you’re stressed, organised or relaxed as you go through life, unexpected circumstances will arise.

It isn’t necessarily anything good or bad but rather something you haven’t planned for, something that you did not anticipate.

Often these things knock us for 6 and we find ourselves stuck or setback. I think that comes from the fact that we aren’t open to the motion of life. We get so caught in wanting things to be a certain way that forget that there’s an infinite number of awesome outcomes that we could be willing to explore.

So next time, instead of pushing back or getting frustrated by unexpected circumstances, remain open to them and maybe even try embracing them.

Making a mountain out of a molehill

It might not be such a bad idea.

When it comes to creating content, you have so many options: blog posts, Instagram feed, Insta-stories, IGTV, YouTube, podcasts, tweets etc.

I’ve been thinking about how instead of just creating one thing, you can share one piece of content across different platforms.

That’s a great way to reach more people because blog readers might not watch YouTube and people that listen to podcasts might not be on twitter.

I think it can also be useful when building a brand and trying to grow your audience to not just be in one place.

With this blog I’ve been reluctant to do anything apart from write a blog posts each day because I don’t want to create more work than I can handle alongside a full-time job, part-time study and my lifestyle blog.

But I’m at a point where I’m close to 1 year of daily blogging and I’m opening myself up the idea of sharing things on Instagram and possibly having audio versions of the post or perhaps a podcast.

And so the blogposts are the molehills but the potential to create a variety of content from these posts is the mountain.

I’m realising that this writing practice based around personal growth and random musings can become so much more than I initially intended.

 

Here’s why I stopped writing monthly todo lists

They didn’t work for me.

At the start of every month I used to write a bunch of goals (well more like to-dos), maybe around 25. At the end of every month I never failed to have at least a few things left.

28-31 days is a long time to plan for and I found myself just sort of creating a random todo list of stuff for the month that I just never stuck to.

I’d write them with good intentions but my actions for the weeks that followed were somewhat half-hearted.

Now granted the solution may have been to just get more committed but I actually just switched to weekly todo lists instead.

I’ve found that making plans for myself every seven days gives me a chance to be a lot more focused.

And as a result I’m slowly but surely getting better at getting things done.

 

On being content with not becoming a writer

Or at least trying to be.

I remember being around 16 or 17 telling a classmate about my writing hobby and that I had thought of doing it as a career. At the time I was pretty lost with regard to career plans and my civil engineering dream was becoming less and less likely.

My classmate on the other hand was an excellent academic – who went on to study medicine.

He told me (in a roundabout way) that sometimes when you try to turn your hobby into your career it ruins it.

At the time I think I said something like yeah you’re right. But in my head I thought but I wanna be a writer and over half a decade later I still think that.

However, despite wanting to be a writer, I’m now 2 years into a career in transport. For the most part, I’m pretty happy with where I’m at and that has made me realise that more than wanting to be a writer what I really want is to write.

And I do write.

Every.

Single.

Day.