Unexpected circumstances

Whether you’re stressed, organised or relaxed as you go through life, unexpected circumstances will arise.

It isn’t necessarily anything good or bad but rather something you haven’t planned for, something that you did not anticipate.

Often these things knock us for 6 and we find ourselves stuck or setback. I think that comes from the fact that we aren’t open to the motion of life. We get so caught in wanting things to be a certain way that forget that there’s an infinite number of awesome outcomes that we could be willing to explore.

So next time, instead of pushing back or getting frustrated by unexpected circumstances, remain open to them and maybe even try embracing them.

Making a mountain out of a molehill

It might not be such a bad idea.

When it comes to creating content, you have so many options: blog posts, Instagram feed, Insta-stories, IGTV, YouTube, podcasts, tweets etc.

I’ve been thinking about how instead of just creating one thing, you can share one piece of content across different platforms.

That’s a great way to reach more people because blog readers might not watch YouTube and people that listen to podcasts might not be on twitter.

I think it can also be useful when building a brand and trying to grow your audience to not just be in one place.

With this blog I’ve been reluctant to do anything apart from write a blog posts each day because I don’t want to create more work than I can handle alongside a full-time job, part-time study and my lifestyle blog.

But I’m at a point where I’m close to 1 year of daily blogging and I’m opening myself up the idea of sharing things on Instagram and possibly having audio versions of the post or perhaps a podcast.

And so the blogposts are the molehills but the potential to create a variety of content from these posts is the mountain.

I’m realising that this writing practice based around personal growth and random musings can become so much more than I initially intended.

 

Here’s why I stopped writing monthly todo lists

They didn’t work for me.

At the start of every month I used to write a bunch of goals (well more like to-dos), maybe around 25. At the end of every month I never failed to have at least a few things left.

28-31 days is a long time to plan for and I found myself just sort of creating a random todo list of stuff for the month that I just never stuck to.

I’d write them with good intentions but my actions for the weeks that followed were somewhat half-hearted.

Now granted the solution may have been to just get more committed but I actually just switched to weekly todo lists instead.

I’ve found that making plans for myself every seven days gives me a chance to be a lot more focused.

And as a result I’m slowly but surely getting better at getting things done.

 

On being content with not becoming a writer

Or at least trying to be.

I remember being around 16 or 17 telling a classmate about my writing hobby and that I had thought of doing it as a career. At the time I was pretty lost with regard to career plans and my civil engineering dream was becoming less and less likely.

My classmate on the other hand was an excellent academic – who went on to study medicine.

He told me (in a roundabout way) that sometimes when you try to turn your hobby into your career it ruins it.

At the time I think I said something like yeah you’re right. But in my head I thought but I wanna be a writer and over half a decade later I still think that.

However, despite wanting to be a writer, I’m now 2 years into a career in transport. For the most part, I’m pretty happy with where I’m at and that has made me realise that more than wanting to be a writer what I really want is to write.

And I do write.

Every.

Single.

Day.

3 kinds of people in the workplace

Person A
Someone who is confident, asks questions, isn’t afraid to rock the boat when necessary, puts themselves forward, goes above and beyond, voices their opinions and is keen to learn new things.

Person B
Someone who does what they’re told and is content ploughing along. They might want to do more but they’re unlikely to seek it out because it would require more of them than they’re willing to give.

Person C
Someone that thought they could be Person B but deep down they’re a Person A, they just don’t have the confidence. They’re the person who is scared to put themselves forward but wants to do more. They have opinions but don’t often share them. They want to do more than the bare minimum┬ábut are also afraid of the attention.

I think most people fit into one of these categories. And of course overtime you can move from one to another. When Person B decides they want more they become person C and then (hopefully) Person A.

But interestingly enough person A can change too. Often caused by their ideas not being embraced, or getting too much pushback, being told to be a little less of themselves etc.

Person A is the most valuable of the three, they get things done whilst being willing to express their humanness.

Person B is like a cog. They don’t stand out and anyone could do what they do.

And Person C, well they have the potential to be great, if they’re willing to try.

Aspirations, assurance and an abundance of ideas

A few months ago I had an idea for my book and I planned to spend my summer writing in-between picnics, parties and Prosecco.

But summer came, summer went and nothing ever came of that book idea. Infact, I don’t even remember the idea that I had.

But then a few days ago I had another idea and I thought about how great it was that I have ideas in abundance.

And perhaps this current book idea will just become a series of blog posts but it could also become my bestselling debut.

Either way this situation of forgetting a good idea and quite seamlessly moving on to something else I’m just as happy with has served as important reminder.

First of all to follow through with my ideas but also that I’m full of them and I want to share them.

It can be difficult to admit that because it feels a bit showy to put yourself out there but it’s also necessary.

 

Should we be attached to the outcome?

Yes, no, maybe so.

There’s a thing in NLP about outcome based actions, that what we do should be based on the outcome we desire.

But recently I found myself thinking about how it’s important to not be too attached to the way things turn out.

At least not to the point where you crash and burn when things don’t go to plan.

It’s an interesting balance between action and outcome.

Sometimes we do things we wouldn’t normally do in the hopes of getting what we want. Sometimes it works out in our favour and other times not so much.

I believe that your actions should be done in support of your desired outcome but you shouldn’t be so attached to the result that you’re disheartened if things don’t work out.

Because no matter how hard you try, wish and will, their is only one single factor that you can actually control.

Yourself.