Asking for what you want

I think that sometimes we’re afraid to ask for what we want because we’re afraid that we won’t get it.

And so, it seems easier to stay where we are and to stick with what we have right now than to seek more. If you don’t believe that you can have it then what’s the point?

But, I still think that it’s important to ask and to seek more. This is how you create the life that you want. If your expectations and ideas of what you can have and what is possible for your life are capped based what particular people will agree to, then you’re never going to have the life you want.

Just because one person says no, doesn’t mean you’ll never get a yes. It’s also important to remember that you might not even need anyone’s permission, you can decide what you want for yourself and then go for it.

Asking the right questions

Before you ask the question, you probably have a pretty good idea of what you want the answer to be.

Sometimes it goes as far as you formulating a question in order to hear a specific answer, like prasie or a compliment.

And sometimes it comes from a place of vanity but other times perhaps you need a little reassurance or a confidence boost.

Then there are other situations where we beat around the bush and ask questions that don’t quite get us the information we wanted. We’re indirect instead of direct. We do this from a place of fear.

When you’re scared to ask a question it’s much easier to ask around the question but the issue with this is that you end up unsatisfied.

The answer you get doesn’t satisfy you because you really wanted to ask about something else. You end up still having more to ask.

This is why it’s so important to ask the right questions.

Asking for feedback

Some are scared to ask for feedback whilst others are afraid to give it.

You don’t want to offend anyone or maybe if they’re more experienced than you, you don’t think you have the authority.

But I’ve learnt that it’s good to ask for feedback. In fact, I’m trying to do more of it in all aspects of my life. From colleagues, my manager, family, friends and even from you.

It’s not about looking for praise or a harsh critique but instead about opening yourself up to the perspective of the observer or receiver because you don’t see things the way they do.

For example, at work you may think that you’re doing your job well because you haven’t been given a warning or been told you’re under-performing. However, perhaps your manager has noticed you could do x, y or z differently but hasn’t said anything because you aren’t bad at what you do.

It’s about being open to seeing that there is room for improvement.

And so I wanted to ask, if you had to make a remark about this blog, what would you say?

Leave a comment or drop me an email: thedailygemm@gmail.com