Dancing with fear

I could probably write a book on things I’ve learnt from Seth Godin.

Seth taught me that maybe this fear is something I can work with instead of work for. As in, I can do everything I want to do and still have fear, instead letting the fear dictate what I do (which always ends up with me not doing what I actually want to do).

Learning to dance with fear is often uncomfortable (because it’s new) but it’s taught me valuable lessons about moving through life.

The best place to start is somewhere small because it’s like a form of immersion therapy. Imagine if you’re learning to swim, diving in at the deep end with no arm bands is probably a silly idea. You might end up panicking, swallowing water and needing to be rescued.

If that happens you’re unlikely to dust yourself off and try again. You almost died, it’s too dangerous, how could you even think it was a good idea. And your body will do it’s thing in letting you know it was dangerous and that you need to protect yourself. At that point even the shallow end will seem too risky.

But if you start at the shallow end and do the smallest uncomfortable thing that doesn’t feel too risky you might be willing to do something slightly bigger bit by bit overtime.

And then eventually diving in at the deep end won’t seem so risky. Because you’ve done everything else before that and it’s turned out okay. You’ll be at a point where you know what to do if you feel overwhelmed and even if you need a little help or support it you won’t feel like a failure.

Then once you’re out the deep end you’ll be okay to go back in again.

Turns out it wasn’t so scary after all.

The opposite of going with the flow

I’m more than certain that there’s a quote that goes something like:

It’s easier to ride the wave than it is to resist the tide

But there’s a time for both of those things.

A time to go with the flow and a time to go against it.

The interesting thing about life is that sometimes when you’re so set on doing things one way you end up discovering that the best thing to do is the very opposite.

A boat with no oars

I used to think of life like an ocean and me a small boat with no oars to paddle. Life would essentially toss me about and almost tip me right over and I did nothing because I was without oars.

But then one day I discovered oars and suddenly there I was steering myself through the waves of life and granted the waters aren’t always smooth but that’s what makes things interesting.

We’d get bored if it was always smooth sailing.

 

The last hurdle

The bit that is often rushed, least cared about and the most overlooked is the bit before the end.

I’m learning that adopting a sprinters mentality might be the way to go. To pace myself for the long haul but to always leave a surplus for the end. For when I’m tired and motivation is low.

So that I can finish as strong as I started.