Taking the right approach

You’re either A, B or somewhere in-between.

Person A takes the do it now approach and gets things done as they arise or sets time aside to do it in the future.

Person B takes the do nothing approach, also known as the do it later approach, think of a procrastinator. Person B does nothing when things arise even if they know that they could do it now.

They put things off until they’re short of time and then wonder why their heart is palpitating (I’ve been Person B many times).

But there comes a time when you have to do some self-reflection to understand what is and isn’t working. Ask yourself ‘What can I do to make things in my life run smoother?’

I think reevaluating the approach you take in life is the equivalent of a keystone habit (one habit that has a domino effect where you end up changing a bunch of habits as a result of changing one).

A person that takes the do nothing approach is more likely to be overwhelmed, unorganised, tense, stressed, less productive and be achieving much less than they’re capable of.

If you’re able to identify with Person B, you might feel like it’s too hard to change your ways. But there’s a beautiful thing called neuroplasticity that allows your brain to change.

Once you make a commitment to to your own development, it just takes practice.

Getting into the habit: This isn’t just about seeds

Hemp, Linseed and Chia seeds don’t taste particularity great but they’re good for you.

How does one overcome the taste in order to gain the long-term benefits of the seeds.

You do it by accepting that this doesn’t taste great but once you get into the habit of it, it won’t be so bad. Plus think about the long-term benefits.

It takes the brain a while to get used to the new. And often there is that adjustment period of a new routine and in this case a new taste.

But giving it a go and sticking with it through the adjustment period is how you get into the habit of it.

The taste is short-term but you have so much to gain in the long run.

Survival mode and everyday life

I recently tried something new and the outcome was not what I had anticipated it would be.

In these kinds of situations our minds will start to tell stories of why we should stick with what we know and the dangers of exploring outside of that.

You might be in a mental space where you can get past that but if not I have a useful reminder.

The part of your brain that is telling you to stay safe and stick with what you know is coming from a place of survival mode. But you don’t need to apply a survival mode mentality to things like voicing your opinion, being rejected or having your first Unagi roll.

New things are good for us, they help us develop and expand which in turn allows us to get more out of this human experience.

Your personal filing system

I’m a big believer in self-help and mind management, mostly based on my own experiences of how I’ve learnt and implemented things into my life that have transformed it.

I was recently talking ‘minds stuff’ with someone and I used my favourite analogy of going through the filing cabinets of your mind.

It’s like we all have our own personal filing systems that have a log of all our experiences and thoughts and sometimes it’s a mess.

It’s not always easy to manage more cabinets of information than you can counts on your fingers and toes.

When you take a wander down the hallways of your mind  and flick through the files of information, you’ll often end up coming across things you forgotten even existed

The time when you and your sister played outside your childhood home on the pink barbie scooter or the book on insects you used to read as a kid that terrified you because it had illustrations of cockroaches about 100 times bigger than they are in real life.